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Category Archives: Employment Contract

NonCompete5

Explaining New York Non-Compete Agreements

By Mansell Law, LLC |

Most executive employees are considered to be reliable hard workers, and are prized accordingly. However, given their often-specialized knowledge, sometimes they are viewed with suspicion when they depart a company. These employees are seen as so talented sometimes that employers historically would try to regulate their ability to earn a living elsewhere. These “non-compete”… Read More »

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Breaches Of New York Employment Contracts

By Mansell Law, LLC |

As of this writing, 49 of 50 U.S. states are “at-will” employment states (Montana being the lone exception), meaning that any employee can be terminated for any reason at any time. There are certain exceptions to this rule – one cannot be fired for a discriminatory reason, as one might imagine, and a person… Read More »

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EmpContract3

Explaining New York Employment Contracts

By Mansell Law, LLC |

Most people who work a job in New York are classified as at-will employees, meaning that either the employer or the worker can terminate their relationship at any time, for (almost) any reason. There is, however, a small percentage of employees who work under contract, which gives them a different set of rights and… Read More »

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Should I Sign A New York Employment Agreement?

By Mansell Law, LLC |

The significant majority of workers in New York work “at will,” which means that they do not have a verbal or written employment agreement with their employers – indeed, most employees in the United States work on an at-will basis. This means that an employee may leave their job, or an employer may terminate… Read More »

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EmpContract

Is my New York non-compete agreement valid?

By Mansell Law, LLC |

The common-law concept of restraint of trade is an idea that dates back to 18th-century English law, but is still observed in today’s United States. The principle of free trade is a sacred one in U.S. and U.K. law, and restraining it has to be done under very specific circumstances. Restricting trade sometimes happens… Read More »

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